Generally scholars of systematic theology and patristics are in agreement that the earliest view of eschatology in the Church is premillennialism. From the late first century until the time of Augustine in the fourth century, some form of premillenial expectation of Jesus’ return was either the dominant view, or held by a number of prominent leaders and theologians of the Church...
How the Old and New Testaments relate to one another is one of the central issues in biblical hermeneutics. Closely related to this topic is the relationship between the nation of Israel and the universal church. How one wades through these issues of continuity and/or discontinuity is normally the point of departure between the various camps of Covenant Theology and Dispensationalism. While these issues may reflect the point of departure, the root of the distinction goes back to the underlying presuppositions and beliefs about hermeneutics...
Last year I presented a paper to this body regarding the Jewish historian Josephus’ understanding of the Olivet Discourse and the Fall of Jerusalem and particularly how Preterists had written about Josephus’ recording of the event. Preterists have sought to demonstrate that the words of Jesus about His Second Coming in judgment is the destruction that He speaks of in the Olivet Discourse, that the Antichrist is the Roman government’s assault on Jerusalem mentioned in Daniel 9, and that the abomination of desolation refers to Titus’ sacrilege in his destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. They are divided as to whether there are still some aspects of Christ’s prophecy about His coming in the clouds yet to be fulfilled...